Effect of Temperature Regimes on Morphological Development of Selected Canola (Brassica napus) Genotypes

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J. S. Nwogha
G. A. Agenbag
J. E. Obidiegwu
C. O. Amadi

Abstract

Seven canola genotypes selected from early and mid-maturing groups of canola genotypes presently planted in the Western Cape canola production area were grown in 3 litre plastic bags filled with a mixture of sand and compost at ratio of 1:1 and irrigated with fully balanced nutrient solution at EC=2.0 in two glasshouses at night/day temperature regimes of 10/15˚C and 15/20˚C. Plant heights were measured at 14 days interval from 28 to 84 days after planting (DAP). Plants were sampled for leaf area (LA) and above ground dry mass (DM) at budding, flowering and seed physiological maturity stages. Plant growth rates (PGR) from planting to budding, from budding to flowering and from flowering to physiological maturity growth stages were calculated. Relative growth rates (RGR) and net assimilation rates (NAR) from budding to flowering and from flowering to physiological maturity stages were also calculated. Days after planting, GDD and PTU at budding, flowering and physiological maturity were correlated with leaf area, dry mass, number of pods plant-1   and pod dry mass plant-1 at budding, flowering and physiological maturity stages to determine whether there were relationships between the variables. The study showed that by increasing night/day temperature from 10/15˚C to 15/20˚C plant height, number of leaves plant-1 at budding stage, leaf area at budding , plant growth rate (PGR) from planting to budding stage and relative growth rate (RGR) from budding to flowering stage were increased. However, PGR from budding to physiological maturity, RGR from flowering to physiological maturity, net assimilation rate (NAR) from budding to flowering stage, leaf area at flowering and physiological maturity stages, as well as  number of flower stems, number of pods  plant-1, above ground total dry mass at flowering and physiological maturity  stages were  decreased. Pod dry mass at physiological maturity decreased by 22.24% to 40.35% for different genotypes which clearly demonstrated the variations in sensitivity of canola genotypes to increasing night/day temperatures and also indicates that canola crop can be genetically improved for heat tolerance.

Keywords:
Physiology, canola, morphology, genotypes, heat tolerance, relative growth rate

Article Details

How to Cite
Nwogha, J. S., Agenbag, G. A., Obidiegwu, J. E., & Amadi, C. O. (2019). Effect of Temperature Regimes on Morphological Development of Selected Canola (Brassica napus) Genotypes. Journal of Agriculture and Ecology Research International, 17(2), 1-16. https://doi.org/10.9734/jaeri/2018/v17i230042
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Original Research Article