Economics of West African Dwarf (WAD) Goat Production among Small Holder Farmers in Humid and Tropical Region of the World

Main Article Content

S. I. Ume

Abstract

Economics of West African Dwarf (WAD) goat Production by Small Holder Farmers in humid and tropical region was studied using 120 farmers selected from southeast states of Nigeria. The information generated for the study comprised farmers’ socio-economic characteristics and other quantitative variables relevant to the study using mainly structured questionnaire and personal interviewed, descriptive Statistic such as percentage response and budgetary technique were used to address the objectives of the study. The mean of age of the farmer was 54 years, level of education was 11 years, while years of rearing experience and house hold size were 10 and 7 respectively. The result of net farm income analysis revealed that an average total cost of goat production was  $127,517 per 12 herds of goat with cost of purchasing breeding kids input resource constituting the highest (30%) of total costs of production. A positive net farm income of $23938 was realized by average goat farmer in the study area, indicating the profitability of the enterprise. The identified problems limiting goat production in the region were poor access credit, problem of pests and diseases, seasonality of forage, theft problem, poor extension contact, poor nutrition of confined animal and technology too costly. There are needs for policies options and measures to enhance farmers’ access to education, access to credit, extension services, and access to drugs at subsidized rates to ensure goat production by the farmers.

Keywords:
Economics, West Africa dwarf goat, production, small holder farmers, humid and tropical regions.

Article Details

How to Cite
Ume, S. I. (2019). Economics of West African Dwarf (WAD) Goat Production among Small Holder Farmers in Humid and Tropical Region of the World. Journal of Agriculture and Ecology Research International, 17(2), 1-8. https://doi.org/10.9734/jaeri/2018/v17i230046
Section
Original Research Article